Brighton

Where it all began

Abandofbrothers was established by in Brighton by Michael Boyle and Nathan Roberts. Two very aware and passionate men committed to positive social change through personal development and community building.
Since conception the Brighton our community has grown to over 100 mentors working with over 50 local young men, primarily from the infamous Whitehawk Estate. Regular meetings are held on the Estate and we have been given an allotment   which looks out over Ditchling Beacon, the sea and beyond were we regularly meet to tend the soil, grow our own fruit and vegetables and introduce men to the wonders of naturally frown food comes from.

The impact on the young men, who have come through our community, has been profound to say the least, with dozens of inspirational stories of transformation. Many young men have gone on to become mentors themselves and work with the even younger males on the estate, which in turn has made The Whitehawk Community as safer, friendlier and healthier place for all to live.

Our work in Brighton has brought generations of men, both young and older together to work together in a meaningful and common purpose.  Abandofbrothers acts as a catalyst for creating social capital at a local level.

Our work in Brighton is in partnership with community leaders, local authorities, educationalists, health professionals and all service providers who are seeking an effective way to engage and inspire the energy of male youth.

Another deserving winner – Mark Nightingale

The Rotary Club of Brighton gave Mark a Citizens Award on December 17th for his outstanding contributions through abob to the Brighton community. The awards ceremony was at the Royal Albion Hotel. Mark says: “I felt suitably honoured and accepted my framed certificate with humility and gratitude; knowing the full magnitude of the task presenting itself to us men of abandofbrothers. It was also a great feeling to be able to share the afternoon with my wife who has been so supportive and to be honest without her I would not have been there. So I’m grateful for her...

June 2014 – The Guardian – Mentoring is what young men crave without realising it

Being a man means being responsible, respecting other people, making a contribution to the community … and …” Dave, 28, hesitates for a couple of seconds and looks down at the little girl smiling broadly beside him: “Most of all, it means being a good father,” he says. The girl is his daughter Susie, nine. She’s tugging at my sleeve excitedly. “Excuse me, can I say something?” she says. “I just want to say I’m proud of my dad. I’m really proud he’s my dad.” The most important role anyone can take on is to be a parent. Poor parenting can have devastating consequences, especially in relation to fathers and sons. Dave admits he didn’t always feel able to be a good father to Susie. “I had a major trauma that I’d rather not talk about when I was little,” he explains, “but it affected my whole life, shaped my whole life with depression, anger and violence. It turned me against everyone, even against myself.” Read more...
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